Deadpool 2 ***

The foul-mouthed, super-sarcastic, hero returns in Deadpool 2.

We are given more of the same knowing banter with the audience and ultra violent, consequence free action that seemed so fresh the first time around.

Being unencumbered by not having to tell an origin story, it is straight into the mayhem that has become routine in most of this genre of movie.

This is lightened by the wit and wisdom of the moral free hero.

It is still frequently funny with plenty of ‘did he just say that’ moments to make the film enjoyable but not to the level of the original film.

Sadly the originality of the character now turns predicable and, at times, very strained.

It you enjoyed the first outing, you will probably enjoy this, but not for the first time viewer I am sorry to say.

Down to just 3 stars out of five.

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The Guernsey Literature and Potato Peel Pie Society ****

The Guernsey Literature and Potato Peel Pie Society is an absolutely charming love story.

It is set just after WWII in London and on the Channel isle of Guernsey, with flash backs to the German occupation period.

Featuring a plethora of fine British/Dutch/American acting talent, the story is told at a gentle pace, focusing on the tensions caused between natives and occupiers and the after effects in peacetime.

The story arrives at its inevitable and predictable conclusion, which is nonetheless, very satisfying.

Lily James gives a warm and believable portrayal, which leads the story.  She plays a young author and survivor of the London Blitz, struggling at times with PTSD.

The story could have degenerated into a sentimental tale but avoids this fate with careful measures of humour and grit to balance the sugar.

My only regret about the film is that it was not shot on the island.  Due to financial reasons, it was filmed in the beautiful county of Devon. Anybody expecting to see lovely St Peter Port will have to settle for a very different English fishing village. That is a minor point, but a distraction if you know the locations.

I recommend this for anybody with a love of our history and the tradition of British filmmaking.

At the time of writing, this film is showing at the Odeon for this week, and will undoubtedly moves to the Silverscreen performances in a few weeks.

I award it 4 out of five stars.

 

The Leisure Seeker ***

If you have seen the trailer for The Leisure Seeker, you may have been misled into thinking this is a light comedy about two seniors travelling America.  It is not.

There are comedic moments but at its heart this is a story of fighting against age and its inevitable final destination.

Played by the almost unrecognisable Dame Helen Mirren and the unmistakable Donald Sutherland, the two protagonists embark on a final search for lost memories and lives.

The story is uncomfortable to watch at times as it plunges into the dark pool of dementia, exposing long forgotten and unknown truths about their perfect marriage.

This may have a limited audience but should be seen for the remarkable performances of both actors. Sadly it is let down by the contrived humour and a weak supporting cast.

Just about earns its 3 out of five stars.

The Jeita Restaurant ***** (The delicious flavours of the eastern Mediterranean)

This week my friends and I meet for our bimonthly restaurant outing at the Jeita restaurant in Guildford. This is a recently opened establishment offering Lebanese cuisine including wines.

The décor is light, roomy and modern with comfortable chairs grouped around tables for parties of one upwards.  After a courteous welcome from the manager we studied the menu, which had exotic sounding dishes each excellently described in clear fonts.  My reading glasses were not required.

We rapidly decided to have three starters to share followed by individual mains.

Our choices of starters were a hummus dish covered with thin layers of tender lamb, deep-fried falafel consisting four balls and a light dipping sauce and finally a mixed vegetable with pomegranate dish.  These were served with a generous quantity of fresh flat bread.

All three were consumed with gusto, the only negative being that we could have eaten a lot more hummus. I observed that the falafel balls were the best I have ever eaten and I speak as one who will buy them at the drop of a hat.

For the main course, one of us enjoyed the mixed grill.  This consisted of minced lamb, cubed lamb and cubed chicken with rice.  The other devoured the lamb smothered in a spicy sauce.

I had lamb with okra and rice.  This has a delicious, lightly spiced sauce and brought a big smile to my face.

Two extra sauces accompanied the mains.  The first was a bright red chilli sauce that I approached with trepidation, having lost far too many taste buds to the pernicious plant.  I was delighted to find it gentle on my palate and a true enhancement to the dish.

The second was an equally nice yogurt type mix that went well as a counter balance to the chilli.

Unusually, two of us chose to have desserts.  We both chose Qatayef, a sweet dumpling filled with nuts and honey.  They came in the form of two pancakes folded over to enclose the nut mix.  The honey was light and not too sweet.  Simply put, it was delicious.

To wash down this feast of flavours, two of us consumed a tasty Lebanese red wine (14%) while our nominated driver enjoyed his sparking bottle of water.  Table water was also provided.

All three of us agreed this was an excellent meal and that it should get the full five stars out of 5.

As is our habit, we split the bill three ways, coming to £37 each.  (Don’t worry about this being unfair to the driver, we take it in turns.)

The Jeita is located at 50 Chertsey Street, Guildford, England.

Tomb Raider

This is the re-launch of the Tomb Raider franchise with a new, fit for 21st century, Lara Croft.

Gone are the pneumatic charms of the video game Lara, or the superwoman Angelina Jolie.

We now have a hero in the mould of GoT’s Arya Stark or Star Wars Rey.

Alicia Vikander’s performance alone raises this from just another high adventure into the story of a real human being struggling with circumstances that would defeat most of us.

Unfortunately, she is surrounded by cardboard cut-out friends and villains who add nothing unique to the story.

Tomb 1

I enjoyed the early scenes, shot in and around London and Hong Kong, that were beautiful, exciting and totally believable. The later scenes descend in the now over familiar CGI scenery and perils. These could have been from any number of similar films and require a great effort of imagination to accept.

I am sure that this film will appeal to the less jaded cinema audiences, especially young women, who have traditionally been underserved in such dramas.

For that reason I have raised my assessment to give this film 4 out of five stars.

 

 

 

Finding Your Feet ****

Finding your feet is a lovely little film, in the English tradition of light domestic stories told with emotion and humour.

Full of British TV and Film stars, most notably Timothy Spall, Imelda Staunton, David Hayman, Celia Imrie, and Joanna Lumley.

It is produced and directed by even more of our great British talented people, including those behind the wonderful A Street Cat Named Bob just last year.

The plot encompasses loss in many forms and also survival from those losses.  It also features the best death scene ever, certainly the way I would like to go.

It is told with great kindness for the characters.  There are no big villains, although some are very cruel by their unthinking actions, eventually to be saved.

Happy endings for every character; a feeling of having been hugged for the audience.

I can imagine watching this film again at home over Christmas in front of a warm fire with cosy slippers and a nice glass of sherry.

A well earned 4 out of 5 stars.

Red Sparrow ***

Red Sparrow is a very contemporary play set against the rising threat of Russian expansionism. The cold war of old has been re-kindled but old spy craft is still a primary tool used against the West.

Enter Jennifer Lawrence as one of the nails used by the Russian hammer against, in this case, the Americans.

The story continues with great pace and gusto that gives the initial impression of being an exciting and gripping story. However, this is no Le Carré or Deighton story. There is no light and dark in the characters. The bad guys are all super-bad and the good guys could almost be wearing white hats.

The viewer is kept guessing about the true motivations of Miss Lawrence’s character till the end, but you can see within the early scenes who is going to lose the most.

Red Sparrow 2On top of this plot is laid a visual assault of violence, gore and sex that is unprecedented in my experience in the legitimate cinema. Many scenes were bordering on the pornographic both in violence and nudity.

This may be artistically justifiable, indeed the presence of several A-List actors would indicate they felt it was justified, but not for me.

This would have benefited from clearer story telling, deeper characterisation and less visual exploitation.

Just 3 out of five stars.